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Breaking Down Sick Building Syndrome

It is no surprise that the human body reacts to the environment in which it is in. Your home is the place that you spend most of your time. Everyone would like to believe that their home is in pristine condition. This may be true when looking at the exterior, what about the parts of your home that you cannot see? These pieces would be inside of walls, within air ducts and even what the air you are breathing. If you are feeling sick or under the weather in your home, you may be experiencing sick building syndrome.

What Is Sick Building Syndrome?

Sick building syndrome, or SBS, is where someone seems to become sick inside of a building with no visible causes. The causes are normally due to airborne bacteria or chemicals caused by flaws in the ventilation, heating or AC systems. It is important to know what the symptoms may be to help treat and fix the issues.

What are the Symptoms of SBS?

Symptoms related to this syndrome reflect and mimic those of seasonal allergies from minimal to severe reactions. Some of the minimal reactions may be headaches, throat irritation, runny nose or sneezing. More severe reactions include skin rashes, difficulty breathing, burning sensations or tightness in the chest. It is important to properly assess and treat these issues before there are more extreme issues.

How to Treat SBS

When exposed to the flaws within buildings, your body may react. While you are able to treat bodily symptoms with allergy pills and painkillers, there are more important measures to be taken. To treat the house so that all of these flaws may go away, it is important that you call a heating and air conditioning company so they can look into the issue. The air conditioning company is able to look at vents, air ducts as well as other systems to ensure that no harmful chemicals are becoming airborne in your home.

If it’s time to have your house examined, contact the professionals at Big Mountain Heating and Air today.